Exponent Philanthropy

About Philanthropy Lessons

Philanthropy Lessons is a video series and campaign produced by Exponent Philanthropy, funded by the Fund for Shared Insight, and released in partnership with The Chronicle of Philanthropy. Together, to help others be more effective and efficient in creating the change they want to see in the world, we are sharing words of wisdom from some of our industry’s most inspirational funders about what they have learned throughout their philanthropic careers.

We invite funders to share your philanthropy lessons as we work to increase openness in the field and accelerate effective philanthropy. Read more >>

 

All Videos

  • by Linda Spady, Winifred Stevens Foundation October 2nd, 2016

    Dad ran an amazing foundation, with his children’s help, for 18 years. But we never had legal counsel or grant proposal and reporting forms. We are so much more effective now and it has really helped our grantees to focus and evaluate.

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Becoming More Effective

    Expand
  • by Becky Foerster, The Hagerman Foundation September 29th, 2016

    Impact can be achieved when you embrace community, the people and together reach new heights.

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Achieving Impact

    Expand
  • by Allison Salas, Mike & Mary Terry Family Foundation September 28th, 2016

    Keep it simple, we’re all people looking to move the needle forward. Ask questions, lean in, collaborate.

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Keep It Simple

    Expand
  • by Sammy Politziner, Co-Founder, Arbor Brothers, Inc. July 20th, 2016

    I was just reading the Jill Lepore’s article in The New Yorker titled “Baby Doe,” which chronicles the history of the child welfare system in the United States. In it, she quotes someone who says, “There is a monotony about the injustices suffered by the poor that perhaps accounts for the lack of interest the rest of society shows in them.”  (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Getting out of the office

    Expand
  • by Gregory Horner, Cedar Tree Foundation June 24th, 2016

    When things aren’t going well with a grant, a site visit can help you quickly get to the bottom of things. Executive director was fired or left suddenly? Several board members quit at once? Financial crisis? When an organization is in flux, the success of your grant is at risk. (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On One of Several Times to Site Visit

    Expand
  • by Marty Fluharty, The Americana Foundation June 5th, 2016

    In 1992, I was asked by a colleague to help The Americana Foundation learn about an issue being discussed in our state (Michigan). I met with the board and suggested that they gather with some of the diverse stakeholders and hear their perspectives of the issue. Three intense days later, we all walked away with a list of recommendations and implementation agreements. It was a powerful lesson in what 27 people with very diverse opinions and beliefs can do when they work together.

    (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On From Silos to Shared Goals

    Expand
  • by Lou Beccaria, Ph.D., Phoenixville Community Health Foundation June 3rd, 2016

    The practice of effective philanthropy involves a team approach no matter how you look at it. On one hand are the philanthropic groups with the financial and other resources (such as board and staff experience, expertise, and time) necessary to make things happen. On the other are the nonprofit, community benefit organizations with the programmatic and service delivery wherewithal to get the job done. One without the other is fruitless.

    (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Philanthropy Lessons: Value Beyond Dollars

    Expand
  • by exponent May 10th, 2016

    [Over the past 20 years] I have changed in my understanding of my various roles in philanthropy and the value I bring to those roles. Twenty years ago I thought if I could just be the smartest person in the room I would be a valuable asset because I would have all the answers. I am not exactly sure when I realized that my pursuit was not only an impossibility, but the wrong goal.

    (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On We Can Only Imagine What the Next 20 Years Will Bring

    Expand
  • by Carrie Avery, The Durfee Foundation May 8th, 2016

    I was excited when a colleague told me about her idea for a grant program to help retiring baby boomer executive directors of nonprofits transition out of their roles and into consulting positions at other nonprofits. I thought this was genius. Not only did it address an issue that funders have been discussing for a long time—the need to smooth the transition of outgoing EDs and pave the way for new talent—but it provided wise counsel to mid-sized nonprofits in need of senior staff. Thinking that this was a program that Durfee could launch, I presented it to my board. They shared my enthusiasm and signed off on planning funding.

    (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On A Lesson in Humility

    Expand
  • by Michael Corley, The Patterson April 2nd, 2016

    You have a good idea for your organization. You have the opportunity to receive free consulting to help implement that idea. However, you aren’t sure your organization has the capacity to execute on that idea. What do you do? Do you take the valuable, free consulting or not?  (more…)

    No Comments

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    *

    No Comments On Make “Opting Out” OK

    Expand